“and then She was shipped across the world” and “Document2” by Parag Desai

and then She was shipped across the world to work and produce, and to work and produce, in a fortress of infinite greed, tending slot machines, for donald trump in february of ’93.   She met the man she married after a lapse of two years. his belly had grown since then, his smile had yellowed since then.   and exactly—with mechanical precision—a year later i was conceived. Her belly too would grow. She quit work to produce, and then worked to produce: a clean kitchen, an undisturbed bed, warm roti, daal, shaak.   the tasks never truly added up … Continue reading “and then She was shipped across the world” and “Document2” by Parag Desai

“Portrait of a girl and her films” by Anjali Bhavan

  take a scalpel to my temple and carve out; frame your questions and let my dreams splay out on your petri-dish. ask me what I really want. and here’s what I’ll tell you: sometimes, I want to be framed like a Guru Dutt film, I want to be nothing but cotton balls and luminous umbrellas shadowing lovers with cups of sake. I want to hide, blush and drape myself in my embarrassing ardour. I want to be a black coat and a graduate’s moustache, perhaps the last blot of grey ink on a dying poet’s poem for the muse … Continue reading “Portrait of a girl and her films” by Anjali Bhavan

A Short Interview with Elizabeth Ruth Deyro, Founder of The Brown Orient

Enjoy a short interview with our beloved affiliate The Brown Orient‘s founder Elizabeth Ruth Deyro and spread the word about this fabulous publication.  terseeditor: When did you become interested in writing publicly? Elizabeth Ruth Deyro: My professor in Creative Writing class, which I took in 2014, was the first to introduce me to publishing with independent literary journals. As he himself was fond of submitting poetry and known for having an admirable number of publications under his belt, he also encouraged our class to do the same. Often, he’d require us to submit to calls for submissions, and give incentives … Continue reading A Short Interview with Elizabeth Ruth Deyro, Founder of The Brown Orient

‘Please Hear What I’m Not Saying’: A Short Interview With Editor Isabelle Kenyon

terse editor: In the introduction to Please Hear What I’m Not Saying you mention how limited mental health services are in terms of funding and support. When did it first occur to you that you’d make the focus of your collection mental health in order to raise money for Mind, the mental health charity? Can you tell me what drew you to their organization specifically? Isabelle Kenyon: The focus of mental health came about both from my observations of the poetry being shared across social media platforms, the themes of mental health emerging from those, and my desire to create a theme which was … Continue reading ‘Please Hear What I’m Not Saying’: A Short Interview With Editor Isabelle Kenyon

Manifestos: A Prose Poem by Wes Bishop

“Who runs the world?” I ask because I have complaints. The little man tells me the box for such things is down the hall. I stumble, clutching my manifestos. If only the masses would read these typed blueprints for utopia then the world would work, because I am a mechanic for reality! I get to the box, but it is closed. The sign reads— UNDER CONSTRUCTION. SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS.   So, I tweet. I post. I comment and I yelp.   I set my phone to vibrate text alert so if anyone comments their digital voice will trip the … Continue reading Manifestos: A Prose Poem by Wes Bishop

Capitalism, Oswald’s day out, Silence by Shivangi Goel

Three poems by contributor Shivangi Goel.   Capitalism We made the world we live in, And we have to make it over. Baldwin says to me, over Tea on couch across generations Of whispers of learnings snuffled Across ink and what confluence Would have it that only this voice reaches, It doesn’t lie, doesn’t exaggerate Taking me up the throat, gargling its Way out This venom This venom We’re accomodating unknowingly I mean all of it is not venom, and All of me is not shaken To the shaky wiggly mud patches Of what I know and am sure to … Continue reading Capitalism, Oswald’s day out, Silence by Shivangi Goel

And I Loved Them by Elisabeth Horan

A poem by contributor Elisabeth Horan.     Is it my turn to use them? I asked, in doe-eyed chin up hopefulness –   Not yet, replied father-fuhrer. Maybe tomorrow.   I never really got a chance to play with them – they were under lock and key behind the rum, above the crackers   They were shiny, mysterious, like magic: twinkly, yet smooth of wooden grain. The smell of pipe and strawberry always floated about them, then remained.   Daddy and Sissy didn’t know that I took them out one day.   I snuck them out and ate of … Continue reading And I Loved Them by Elisabeth Horan

Footnotes: On St. Ives, Education, and Death by Andrew Woods

Too many books are printed in St. Ives. I came to this conclusion as I harvested publication details for the bibliography of my latest paper. Students and scholars alike dread the tedious duty of transcribing this information—from the name of publishers to the year of publication—into the footnotes and reference lists of their essays. And, according to academic procedures, one must mention where the book was printed. That’s how I noticed that my paperback editions of Nietzsche, Weil, Foucault, Burke, and others all seem to originate from St. Ives. I wonder why publishers seem so keen to print their books … Continue reading Footnotes: On St. Ives, Education, and Death by Andrew Woods

Braving the Days: To the Minute by Jordannah Elizabeth

Photo By: T.J. Beach The very first installment of “Braving the Days” was published on December 2, 2016. I must admit that I am none the wiser, but that doesn’t take me out of the running to have become a better woman. I believe I have become a better human being in many ways. I also believe that I am learning: in life, less can be more. I didn’t tour all over the world this year, but I’ve been to the local zoo. I didn’t play a big concert, but I played a house concert in front of 10 friends. … Continue reading Braving the Days: To the Minute by Jordannah Elizabeth