“Black White and Blue” by Ana Gardner

        1. The first time a wooden hanger hit my thigh, I crawled into a storybook of Arabian nights, And burrowed through the pages, deep into silence and inky walls   Every story a new home       Save for two.   The tale of an ungrateful boy who out of greed killed his wife and mother Left me cold and angry The man who cut off his sister’s hand made me crumple the pages.   I grieved for those women, wise and good and wronged But wondered how they were so resigned to their tragedy Sad about their … Continue reading “Black White and Blue” by Ana Gardner

“SIBYL OF THE INNER CITY” by Lorraine Schein

She is her own inner circle, circling.  She lives alone in a fifth-floor, walk-up cave. The other side of her door is inscribed with a pentacle, scratched into the metal frame with a knife. She slams the door and enters the loft, goes to the unmade bed, and throws her coat on it. Her bed has a wooden headboard with carved columns on each side. One post holds a silk sleep mask that she wears so the sunlight does not wake her in the morning. She goes to sleep past midnight, and always sleeps till noon. The curtains are closed … Continue reading “SIBYL OF THE INNER CITY” by Lorraine Schein

“In the Endless Perfection of Your Absence” by Sahar Khraibani

It is here, in this specific spot, across from this sky, here, where it all began.   Monday, January 30, 2017 at 2:23 PM. Beirut, Lebanon. I have not written about the sea in a while. It has become increasingly harder to think about it, to imagine it, to smell it. I went around telling people that I am taking a hiatus from it being my subject. It being the Mediterranean, the only sea I have ever been in close contact with. I was terrified of repetition, of sounding like a broken record, of writing something I don’t understand. What … Continue reading “In the Endless Perfection of Your Absence” by Sahar Khraibani

“and then She was shipped across the world” and “Document2” by Parag Desai

and then She was shipped across the world to work and produce, and to work and produce, in a fortress of infinite greed, tending slot machines, for donald trump in february of ’93.   She met the man she married after a lapse of two years. his belly had grown since then, his smile had yellowed since then.   and exactly—with mechanical precision—a year later i was conceived. Her belly too would grow. She quit work to produce, and then worked to produce: a clean kitchen, an undisturbed bed, warm roti, daal, shaak.   the tasks never truly added up … Continue reading “and then She was shipped across the world” and “Document2” by Parag Desai

“Portrait of a girl and her films” by Anjali Bhavan

  take a scalpel to my temple and carve out; frame your questions and let my dreams splay out on your petri-dish. ask me what I really want. and here’s what I’ll tell you: sometimes, I want to be framed like a Guru Dutt film, I want to be nothing but cotton balls and luminous umbrellas shadowing lovers with cups of sake. I want to hide, blush and drape myself in my embarrassing ardour. I want to be a black coat and a graduate’s moustache, perhaps the last blot of grey ink on a dying poet’s poem for the muse … Continue reading “Portrait of a girl and her films” by Anjali Bhavan

A Short Interview with Elizabeth Ruth Deyro, Founder of The Brown Orient

Enjoy a short interview with our beloved affiliate The Brown Orient‘s founder Elizabeth Ruth Deyro and spread the word about this fabulous publication.  terseeditor: When did you become interested in writing publicly? Elizabeth Ruth Deyro: My professor in Creative Writing class, which I took in 2014, was the first to introduce me to publishing with independent literary journals. As he himself was fond of submitting poetry and known for having an admirable number of publications under his belt, he also encouraged our class to do the same. Often, he’d require us to submit to calls for submissions, and give incentives … Continue reading A Short Interview with Elizabeth Ruth Deyro, Founder of The Brown Orient

‘Please Hear What I’m Not Saying’: A Short Interview With Editor Isabelle Kenyon

terse editor: In the introduction to Please Hear What I’m Not Saying you mention how limited mental health services are in terms of funding and support. When did it first occur to you that you’d make the focus of your collection mental health in order to raise money for Mind, the mental health charity? Can you tell me what drew you to their organization specifically? Isabelle Kenyon: The focus of mental health came about both from my observations of the poetry being shared across social media platforms, the themes of mental health emerging from those, and my desire to create a theme which was … Continue reading ‘Please Hear What I’m Not Saying’: A Short Interview With Editor Isabelle Kenyon

Manifestos: A Prose Poem by Wes Bishop

“Who runs the world?” I ask because I have complaints. The little man tells me the box for such things is down the hall. I stumble, clutching my manifestos. If only the masses would read these typed blueprints for utopia then the world would work, because I am a mechanic for reality! I get to the box, but it is closed. The sign reads— UNDER CONSTRUCTION. SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS.   So, I tweet. I post. I comment and I yelp.   I set my phone to vibrate text alert so if anyone comments their digital voice will trip the … Continue reading Manifestos: A Prose Poem by Wes Bishop

Capitalism, Oswald’s day out, Silence by Shivangi Goel

Three poems by contributor Shivangi Goel.   Capitalism We made the world we live in, And we have to make it over. Baldwin says to me, over Tea on couch across generations Of whispers of learnings snuffled Across ink and what confluence Would have it that only this voice reaches, It doesn’t lie, doesn’t exaggerate Taking me up the throat, gargling its Way out This venom This venom We’re accomodating unknowingly I mean all of it is not venom, and All of me is not shaken To the shaky wiggly mud patches Of what I know and am sure to … Continue reading Capitalism, Oswald’s day out, Silence by Shivangi Goel