On the Bodily Pain of Protest by Michelle M. Campbell

  Martyrdom is easiest when you know the ending. It’s the waiting, the continuing struggle toward a diminishing goal post, that is one of the hardest parts. I am part of a group that has been occupying the administration building of Purdue University in protest again the lack of administrative outcry against fascist posters put up around campus in late November. A group of students, and some faculty and staff, have been occupying the atrium of the administration building, just a flight of stairs away from the President’s office, since January 20th. We argued that if the administration did not … Continue reading On the Bodily Pain of Protest by Michelle M. Campbell

Marching Out of D.C. and into the Classroom by Colleen Clemens

The day after the election, my colleague saw murmurings of a march to take place in D.C. the day after the inauguration.  She booked a room in Arlington, not knowing what we were even committing to.  But we knew we needed to commit to something. We were still absorbing the news that Donald Trump had won the election after a long night of watching returns.  We did not know what his presidency would bring.  We felt alone and concerned, so we drafted a manifesto to give voice to our anger and energy.  We knew that was going to be start … Continue reading Marching Out of D.C. and into the Classroom by Colleen Clemens