Found: A Letter for the Art of Love and Colors by Paul Michael Whitfield

Dear, In Safe and Sound,   I write as the crow flies—ashore, on the hard. Something’s happened, my friend. I’m aground, at liberty, and I think you must know. You’re on a run, of course, and a leg from the vanishing angle. There’s nothing so much to say, after all. A sliding pond across the pond, to think of it! And so, I write to you, the manifest all theirs. I was leadsman and three sheets to the wind after a jump. The shifting tides felt like wild gleams, and yelling, “La mal du siècle est le fin de siècle!” … Continue reading Found: A Letter for the Art of Love and Colors by Paul Michael Whitfield

Women and Space by Lay Sion Ng

Whether it is defined as a container for things or the relation between things, the nature of space is often limned with the body-matter of women. Ever since Plato first introduced the existence of space and claimed the nature of space as the figure of the mother, women have become the body-matter for man (Plato 65; Best 184, 187). This linking of space and woman leads to a conception that woman is seen as “the body, the earth, the springboard for man,” which, as Irigaray suggests, enables men to place themselves as a higher subject whose “only connection to the … Continue reading Women and Space by Lay Sion Ng

Braving the Days: The Seasons Are Changing by Jordannah Elizabeth

  It’s only early August and there’s a briskness to the air on the East Coast. Last year, there was blistering heat, and I craved the cool, foggy days of San Francisco, but this season has changed, and so have I. I mean, on a fundamental level I have not. I was talking to my mother about love, and I told her ever since I was a little girl, I never felt the need to prioritize love. I didn’t have the capacity to put friends before a pet, or lovers before colleagues or acquaintances before old friends. It took me … Continue reading Braving the Days: The Seasons Are Changing by Jordannah Elizabeth

Advertisement by Paul Michael Whitfield

Front Album Cover of Corrupted’s 1995 Nadie 1. Beginning one of his many books, 19th-century Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard writes a preface. In the book I have in mind this is followed by another and that by yet another. This book of Kierkegaard’s is a book of them. A book of beginnings of books. i live in san francisco. I read. I write. I listen to Corrupted and the Melvins. My aesthetic is the literary and the λόγος, and the zeitgeist of the longue durée–the auld lang syne. This aesthetic is the love of Des Esseintes and jewel-encrusted, murdered tortoises. … Continue reading Advertisement by Paul Michael Whitfield

The Truth About Time by Keysha Whitaker

Time is infinite and finite. It also doesn’t exist. When I was five or six, my uncle, in his trademark wife beater and green factory pants, tried to teach me to tell time. “What time is it?” He’d point to the white round clock on the wall over the stove in my grandmother’s yellow kitchen. I stumbled. I stuttered. “It’s a quarter to three,” he said, explaining the rules of the big hand and the little hand. Nearly twenty years later, at a holiday gathering, I chatted about how quickly the year passed, a traditional New Year’s Eve conversation starter. … Continue reading The Truth About Time by Keysha Whitaker

The Performance of Contemporary Art [Part 1] by Adam MacHose

What is a professional artist? That sort of word game can sometimes be trivial semantics. Or at best, a predictable Socratic inquiry that ends in “who can say?” But this question informs the way teachers advise students to enter the world as artists, so it’s important to form a basic answer, even if it is incomplete. The commonsense answer in American capitalist culture is something like ‘someone who earns an income from the sale of their art.’ In other words, an artist is a person running a small business who produces art objects marketed as such. By this definition, anyone … Continue reading The Performance of Contemporary Art [Part 1] by Adam MacHose

On the Bodily Pain of Protest by Michelle M. Campbell

  Martyrdom is easiest when you know the ending. It’s the waiting, the continuing struggle toward a diminishing goal post, that is one of the hardest parts. I am part of a group that has been occupying the administration building of Purdue University in protest again the lack of administrative outcry against fascist posters put up around campus in late November. A group of students, and some faculty and staff, have been occupying the atrium of the administration building, just a flight of stairs away from the President’s office, since January 20th. We argued that if the administration did not … Continue reading On the Bodily Pain of Protest by Michelle M. Campbell