“Braving the Days: The Western Understanding of Karma – A Personal Thought Flow” by Jordannah Elizabeth

I saw a post on social media asking “Why do Western people use the word karma so much, but don’t understand what it truly means?” I think about karma often and try to live by its principals, but I am very honest with myself and clear to others when I speak of it: perhaps I can never understand karma the same way our Eastern neighbors do. Like slave spirituals, gospel music, soul and jazz is embedded in the African American communities, in our hearts, in our generational lineage, so is karma in the East. It’s a cultural implant. The Buddhist … Continue reading “Braving the Days: The Western Understanding of Karma – A Personal Thought Flow” by Jordannah Elizabeth

Judging by the Seminar: On Buses and Fascism by Andrew Woods

Most people do not place much faith in bus schedules. Congestion and traffic lights always conspire to delay buses by five minutes or more. When I moved to London, Ontario, I learnt quite swiftly that the arrival and departure of buses in this city do not follow any logical system. At least their randomness allows me to practice the art of waiting and thus cultivate the virtue of patience. I do not have a car or a driver’s license, so the bus is the only mode of transportation that can take me from my neighborhood to the university campus. I … Continue reading Judging by the Seminar: On Buses and Fascism by Andrew Woods

Advertisement by Paul Michael Whitfield

Front Album Cover of Corrupted’s 1995 Nadie 1. Beginning one of his many books, 19th-century Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard writes a preface. In the book I have in mind this is followed by another and that by yet another. This book of Kierkegaard’s is a book of them. A book of beginnings of books. i live in san francisco. I read. I write. I listen to Corrupted and the Melvins. My aesthetic is the literary and the λόγος, and the zeitgeist of the longue durée–the auld lang syne. This aesthetic is the love of Des Esseintes and jewel-encrusted, murdered tortoises. … Continue reading Advertisement by Paul Michael Whitfield

The University Industrial Complex by Anwar Uhuru

  Currently, I am a PhD Candidate in the Humanities, which sounds more glamorous than it really is for those who inhabit these liminal places. The Humanities has always been considered the alternative intellectual arena for those who do not deal with the natural sciences. The sciences are labeled as “dealing with the world as it is,” and the Humanities as a “safe space” for those who don’t do too much thinking: socially viewed as a place for people who love books. Unfortunately, the Humanities does not “rake in” the money the way that STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics) … Continue reading The University Industrial Complex by Anwar Uhuru

On Sleep, Kites, and Trying. by Julie Corredato

“Throw your dreams into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back, a new life, a new friend, a new love, a new country.” ― Anaïs Nin On our fourth date, after returning to town after an exhilarating spring hike to the Pinnacle in Berks County, we grabbed a bite to eat at Hometown Heroes, a local eatery that features homemade mutz (mozzarella) on salads and sandwiches. As we washed down our meals with rounds of fresh IPA, a naïve sense of trust rose in my crooked little heart, which led to a rushed … Continue reading On Sleep, Kites, and Trying. by Julie Corredato