Tet @ the Coffee Shop by Tini Ngatini

Viet Nam has changed my relationship with coffee shops. They used to be a space where I worked and entertained my friends. Then, recently, they became a sort of anthropological space where I encountered a religious event which brought me to another level of appreciation and respect for local culture. That local culture is called Tet. The Coffee shop where I encountered is called ABC. The ABC coffee shop in Ha Noi, Viet Nam is a fusion of Asian and Western atmosphere. It has some Western characteristics like those found in Starbucks and some that might only be found in … Continue reading Tet @ the Coffee Shop by Tini Ngatini

Advertisement by Paul Michael Whitfield

Front Album Cover of Corrupted’s 1995 Nadie 1. Beginning one of his many books, 19th-century Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard writes a preface. In the book I have in mind this is followed by another and that by yet another. This book of Kierkegaard’s is a book of them. A book of beginnings of books. i live in san francisco. I read. I write. I listen to Corrupted and the Melvins. My aesthetic is the literary and the λόγος, and the zeitgeist of the longue durée–the auld lang syne. This aesthetic is the love of Des Esseintes and jewel-encrusted, murdered tortoises. … Continue reading Advertisement by Paul Michael Whitfield

The Ring Shout and the African Presence in America by Anwar Uhuru

In African American and/or Black American culture, the African and or ancestral presence is both visible and invisible. The ways to name what is Black American is in music and the infamous cuisine that has come to be called “soul food.” The production of highly consumed products of Black labor and the descendants is more American than apple pie. For example, no one realizes the blue that appears in the denim that Americans wear so regularly, the corn they consume, the peanuts, soy, rice, the domestic tools, or the music that is deemed “American” owes to Black labor. Those things … Continue reading The Ring Shout and the African Presence in America by Anwar Uhuru

Braving the Days: What a Culture. What a Conundrum. by Jordannah Elizabeth

Photo Credit: Breck Brunson I don’t want to do anything right now. I was born into a culture of the work-a-holic, the indentured servant, the slave with no wages, the wage slave and more currently, the hustler. You want to eat in America?  You want to go to the beach, and eat avocados and play sold out shows, you have to push your body to the brink. It’s not like that everywhere. Mexico invented the pastime of the siesta and Jews don’t work on the Sabbath. People need to rest. And I don’t have to buy in to any pressure, … Continue reading Braving the Days: What a Culture. What a Conundrum. by Jordannah Elizabeth

Ideology in Politics by Wes Bishop

  On November 8, 2016 the United States did the unthinkable. On that day the US political system elected as the next president a billionaire real-estate mogul, and former reality TV star, whose major television claim-to-fame was a series dedicated to firing “disappointing” workers. How did this happen? No doubt this very question will preoccupy political historians for the remainder of time the US is a subject of study. Countless interpretations, analytical lenses, and pieces have already emerged crediting, or blaming, certain aspects of politics, economics, and culture for the rise of Trump. Not all of these interpretations are of … Continue reading Ideology in Politics by Wes Bishop